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Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440

  • Posted on September 22, 2017 at 9:56 am

Monoprice is among the more interesting companies you probably haven’t heard of. Started out of an apartment around a decade ago, the company initially sold everything at a single price, hence the name. That business model may have worked when the product line was mostly cables and connectors, but the company now offers a diverse array that includes monitors (more in a moment), home theatre screens, graphics tablets, headphones, apocket-size pico projector, an action cam, even electric guitars – and, yes, cables, connectors and accessories as well. It’s a lineup with no seeming rhyme or reason, other than quality products at bargain prices.

And that actually is the rhyme and reason behind Monoprice products. According to CEO Ajay Kumar, the company looks for categories where vastly overpriced products predominate. That gives Monoprice room to create and sell products at dramatically lower price points, while still maintaining strong profit margins.
“We are in the right place at the right time with our business model,” says Kumar, who joined the company in July 2011. “We offer the same cable or accessory as national retail brands, but for much less cost. However, we are not cutting corners as we employ high-quality manufacturing partners who work with our specs. Our markup is much lower and we pass those savings to our customers. Monoprice brings them a value proposition they can’t find anywhere else.”
And that leads us to the Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440 Product ID 10489, which is what you came here for. I’ve been rocking this 16:9 (widescreen) monitor for over a month now and it’s stunning. Let’s take a look at the stats and find out why.
Start with the size, 27″. You don’t have to join Grindr to know that size matters. A larger screen means that you can work easily with more windows at once. It makes copying files and editing text and spreadsheets easier and obviously makes working with pictures and video more convenient, if that’s your thing. And if you’re a gamer, a large screen is essential. Ditto if you are, for instance, a daytrader or a designer.
Hand in glove with size is resolution. “WQHD” may sound like a Minneapolis TV station, but it means 2560 x 1440 pixels. Some 27″ screens max out at regular Full HD, which is 1920 x 1080. The higher resolution of the Monoprice unit means that more detail is visible, if your PC’s graphics card supports it. If not, you’ll be limited to 1920 x 1080 (or less, if your PC is really old). A large screen with high resolution allows you to display more information. It makes it easier to do more with your PC.
Since we’re talking graphics cards, another nice feature of the Monoprice 10489 is that it supports four different types of interface: HDMI 1.4, DVI, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2. That means that the monitor is bound to work with your existing graphics card. The package includes VGA and DVI-D cables, but these are standard length (around 6′). Because of the size of the monitor, it’s much easier to use longer cables – you can plug in the cable before maneuvering the monitor into place on your desk. Monoprice has you covered with available 15′ HDMI, DVI-D, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2 cables. Choose the one you need.
The monitor uses LEDs for the backlighting, rather than cold cathode fluorescent tubes. The benefit: more even illumination. And it uses In Plane Switching (IPS) display technology, which means you get a wide viewing angle with no color shift even when the screen is viewed at an extreme angle. Viewing angle is stated as 178 degree in both the horizontal and vertical planes.
Covering that screen is a glossy glass laminate with an antiglare coating. The antiglare coating is not a matte finish; the screen is glossy, but the antiglare coating reduces the intensity of any glare from reflected light. As with any monitor, you’ll want to position it so that ambient light is not reflected directly back at you. I’ve found the screen easy to use.
The monitor comes with a removable stand and has a 100×100 VESA mounting size for use with desk or wall mounts. The stand (which is completely removable) has rotate and tilt adjustments. It doesn’t have height adjustment, a feature found on a small number of other monitors.
The bezel is black plastic and is relatively thick. The OSD controls (brightness, etc.) are easy to reach. The connectors are in the usual awkward place for monitors, along the bottom bezel.
Several other stats are key. One is dead pixels. The monitor has over 10 million subpixels (2560 x 1440 pixels x 3 colors per pixel). If any one of those subpixels is stuck in the on or off position, you get a dead pixel – a spot that is always dark, or always white, red, reddish, green, greenish, etc. Unfortunately, dead pixels are a potential fact of life on all monitors – but Monoprice tells me they offer a zero dead pixel guarantee for a year. It’s an unusually strong guarantee, since other manufacturers often will only guarantee that the dead pixel count won’t exceed 5 or 10. The unit I received had no dead pixels.
Also important are brightness and contrast. Monoprice advertises a brightness rating of 440 cd/m², which it says is more than 15% brighter than most comparable displays, and a maximum dynamic contrast ratio of 80,000:1.
The display is indeed bright, but this is the one area where I noted a difficulty with this product – the screen is a bit too bright, even with the brightness adjustment turned down to the lowest setting. As a result, black areas on screen are rendered slightly grayish. For most people and most applications, this won’t be a problem – and it’s a phenomenon that’s scarcely unique to the Monoprice unit – but graphic designers will want to carefully compare this screen with others to see what meets their needs.
The panel features 109 pixels per inch, which translates to a 0.2331mm pixel size. The unit also includes builtin stereo speakers, which can be fed via a stereo audio cable, as well as audio from the HDMI connection. As with most builtin monitor speakers, the sound was tinny and unimpressive, so I don’t recommend using them. Buy a pair of standalone computer speakers instead.
Another stat is response time, which the company says is 6 milliseconds (gray-to-gray response time). That’s a measurement of how long it takes the monitor to change the image when the PC tells it to, and is an issue for almost no one except gamers.
Bottom line: if you’re looking for a high-quality 27″ WQHD IPS LED monitor at a great price, pick up the Monoprice 10489.

Talk Nokia Lumia Excellence 1020

  • Posted on September 13, 2017 at 12:04 pm

HELSINKI – 41 megapixel camera is a major advantage presented by Lumia 1020. But Nokia claims that there are many other advantages to selling this smartphone.

Head of Marketing and Sales of Nokia in North America Matt Rothschild, said the camera is not the only advantage Lumia 1020. Hardware elements, including the AMOLED screen to accessories Camera Grip and shutter button, says Rothschild, a smartphone is another advantage.

“On the whole, this is what we refer to as the volume of product.’s (Lumia 1020) is very beautiful to grip, has a good balance, and well designed.’s What we call a consideration” Rothschild said, as quoted from Venture Beat, Monday (15/07/2013).

As for the camera, said Rothschild, Lumia 1020 has a very broad target audience, ranging from the professional to make photography only as a hobby.

“But the most important thing for us is that when we talk to customers, they tell us that they want to have a good picture. Everyone knows that smartphones now include photographic device that can be carried anywhere, so this is the core thing that all people are looking for,” he concluded.

Leap Motion Controller, Great Hardware in Search of Great Software

  • Posted on September 12, 2017 at 4:49 pm

By now, we all know what the future will be like; movies and TV shows have described it in detail. We know about the flying cars (thank you, “Blade Runner”), holograms (thank you, “Star Trek”) and robot butlers (thank you, “Jetsons”).

The Leap Motion Controller is a solution in search of a problem: its hardware is simple, but it needs a killer app.

So when will we really get those technologies? Probably on the 11th of “Don’t hold your breath.”

There is, however, one exception. As of this week, you can buy your own little piece of “Minority Report” and “Iron Man”: controlling your computer by making hand motions in the air.

The Internet has been buzzing about the much-delayed Leap Motion Controller ($80) since its first public demonstrations over a year ago. Imagine controlling on-screen objects just by reaching into empty space, just like Tom Cruise! Imagine gesture recognition just like Microsoft’s Kinect game controller, but on a much smaller, more precise scale! Imagine the future, plugged into a USB jack on the Mac or Windows PC you own today!

The Leap Motion sensor is beautiful, tiny and self-contained. If Wrigley’s ever comes out with a Juicy Fruit Designer Pack, it might look like this: a sleek, glass-and-aluminum slab (1.2 by 3 by 0.5 inches), with nonskid rubber on the bottom. A single USB cable (both a long one and a short one come in the box) stretches away to your computer; a light comes on when it’s working.

(Please note that Leap Motion has nothing to do with Leap Pad, the children’s toy. That gadget is educational in a completely different way.)

If you have a desktop computer, you put the sensor between your screen and keyboard. If it’s a laptop, you park it on the desk just in front of the keyboard. Soon, Leap says, you’ll be able to buy a PC from H.P. or Asus that has the sensor built right in.You download the Leap software, and presto: a somewhat buggy tutorial instructs you to insert your hands into the space — an invisible two-foot cube — that’s monitored by the Leap’s cameras and infrared sensors.

This device is like the Kinect in that it recognizes body parts in space. But not only is the Leap far smaller and less expensive, it’s also far more precise. According to the company, it can detect the precise positions of all 10 of your fingers simultaneously, with a spatial accuracy to a 100th of a millimeter — 200 times as accurate as the Kinect.

And remember, the Leap adds gesture recognition not to your TV, but to your computer. A machine that can run millions of different programs for all different purposes. Games, sure, but also office work. Creative work. Communication. Entertainment. Surely this little wonder is a very big deal.

Unfortunately, it’s not. The Leap’s hardware may be simple, attractive and coherent — but its software is scattershot, inconsistent and frustrating.

The first crushing disappointment is that no software recognizes your hand motions unless it’s been specially written, or adapted, for use by the Leap.

There are 75 such apps already on the Leap’s app store, Airspace; some are free, some cost a few dollars. Not all work on both Mac and Windows.

Most are games. In the best of them, you control the action in 3-D space, just as with the Kinect but without having to stand up. For example, Boom Ball ($5) is the classic Breakout game, where you try to knock out bricks by bouncing a ball against them — but your paddle is attached to your finger in vertical space.

In Disney’s clever Sugar Rush ($2), a spin off from the “Wreck-It Ralph” movie, you bake yourself a racing car shaped like a wedge of cake, and then steer it by holding both sides of an invisible steering wheel. When you play Dropchord ($3), you hold two index fingers out in space; you’re defining a line between them that you use to slice dots and avoid X’s. Cut the Rope is here, too (free).

There are some interesting music-making programs, which makes sense, since hand motions are generally associated with playing instruments. Air Harp ($1) is just what it sounds like. Chordion Conductor is a sweet-sounding arpeggiator (generates music from chords you select).

A few simple educational apps are available, like Molecules (rotate molecules on the screen; free), Cyber Science 3D (pull apart a skull; free) and Frog Dissection (you guessed it; $4).

Notebook Lenovo ThinkPad T430u

  • Posted on September 6, 2017 at 8:46 am

Like the models in the fashion world, most outstanding ultrabook now prioritizes slimness of the body and a pretty view. However, these physical characteristics will result in a collision or vulnerable laptop face hostile weather conditions. That try to overcome this shortcoming by presenting a Lenovo T430 repeated his version into the ThinkPad series T430u.

Well, now ultrabook models (ThinkPad T430u) comes with the typical specifications of mobile devices are lightweight and power-saving. Examine the “u” as a marker ultrabook segment here. Series that we try (type 3351-7DA) contains an Intel Core i5-3317U 1.7 GHz, 4GB of main memory, and a 500GB hard disk. Also added a 4GB SSD for ultrabook-style get fast booting.

As general character ultrabook, the Lenovo ThinkPad T430u only include a little plug. This device only provides two USB 3.0 ports, LAN, HDMI, and DisplayPort. This device also has a wireless card slot that can be used to access the internet via a 3G connection. The slot itself is at the back of the laptop is sailing 14 ˝. The bottom of the laptop is also surprisingly easy to open with a special slot (no screwdriver) making it easier for you to upgrade components.

T430u also comes standard Thinkpad features such as finger print reader and an Anti-Theft technology from Intel. However, the laptop weighs 1.9 kg making it a lure is physical endurance-tested to military standards. This test requires the Lenovo ThinkPad T430u resistant to shock, dust, extreme temperatures, up to a humid environment. This is why this Ultrabook casing made slightly thicker (2.2 cm) with glass fiber plastic material to reinforce the cover.

To beautify the inside, Lenovo makes keyboad in design they call the Island-style that stood out. To give the impression of a minimalist, physical buttons for volume settings, wireless, and such removed. Instead, the available combination on the keyboard. Continue to be included on this keyboard also typical ThinkPad trackpoint. With lithiumpolymer 4220mAh battery, the laptop can be used for seven hours continuously.

Given its performance, the Lenovo ThinkPad T430u ultrabook par with most other equivalent. However, it seems to make a strong design-based Windows 8 Pro laptop is becoming prominent. This product is perfect for fans looking for a ThinkPad ultrabook or resilient.

Digital Storm VELOCE, 13.3-inch Gaming Laptop With Intel’s Haswell CPU & GPU NVIDIA GTX 765M Plus 8GB RAM

  • Posted on August 29, 2017 at 11:24 am

Soon the market will be the arrival of a new gaming laptop models known as Digital Storm VELOCE.
With stretcher panel 13.3-inch screen that supports a resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels, 1.25 inches thick laptop weighs 4.6 kg and is fully supported by an Intel Core i7-4800MQ who collaborated with NVIDIA GTX 765M GPU and 8GB of RAM.
And even to support jitunya storage solutions, gaming notebooks running Windows 8 has been providing hard drive plus 750GB 7200RPM 8GB SSD. Not only that, this powerful gaming laptop has also been supported by the 3 USB 3.0 ports, a DVD burner, HDMI, VGA, WiFi, Bluetooth, and much more.
Concerning the availability and price, the Digital Storm gaming laptop VELOCE which will soon be released on July 17, 2013, is reportedly going to be priced at $ 1,535 or the equivalent of 15.34 million dollars per unit.

Nvidia GTX 650 Ti Boost Challenge Radeon HD 7790

  • Posted on August 15, 2017 at 3:44 pm

Jakarta – Not long after AMD launched its latest graphics processor, the Radeon HD 7790, to fill the mainstream classroom, Nvidia did not remain silent and be ready menggeber rival product through Boost GeForce GTX 650 Ti.

Naming Boost on the back of the mainstream series leads directly to the clock speed that it has, which of course has got a touch of ‘turbo’ from Nvidia. Boost rumored GTX 650 Ti GPU Boost feature.

With these features, the GTX 650 Ti Boost which actually has a clock speed of 980 MHz can dynamically increase the clock speed to 1033 MHz as needed. Moreover Boost GTX 650 Ti has 768 CUDA cores armed, 64 TMU, 24 ROP.

While the sector is supported by the use of GDDR5 memory running on a 192-bit interface that comes with a capacity of 1 GB and 2 GB respectively by Nvidia priced at USD 149 (USD 1.4 million) and USD 169 (USD 1.6 million) . Similarly, as quoted from Techpowerup, Wednesday (27/03/2013).

HP Series 600 G1 ProOne Simplify Daily Fulfillment

  • Posted on August 11, 2017 at 6:12 am

JAKARTA – HP Series ProOne ProDesk 600 600 G1 and G1 show business for AiO devices and desktop PCs with the latest design and latest selection of 4th generation Intel Core processor at an affordable price.
Each device allows the user to easily meet daily business needs with a choice of Windows 8, Windows 7, HP Device Support Assistant, HP Client Security applications and strong to protect the data, device and identity.
Increased productivity with HP ePrint for quick and easy wireless printing, as well as DTS Sound for rich audio sound.
ProOne HP AiO 600 G1 is the enterprise-class has a space-saving design with powerful PC performance and secure.
HP ProDesk G1 600 series offers the most popular form factor with the availability of a stable cycle of up to 30 months and to meet everyday business needs with performance and reliability.
Multitasking helped with the choice of storage solutions solid-state drive that makes files and applications together quickly.

Asus Memo Pad HD 7 review: Vivid screen barely outshines slow performance

  • Posted on August 3, 2017 at 9:41 pm

The good: The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 rocks an impressively colorful screen, features a bevy of useful customization options, and comes in at a budget price.

The bad: Its performance is mediocre and the touch screen is sometimes unresponsive. The plastic build gives it a toy-like feel and it isn’t very comfortable to hold. The dull design lacks panache.

The bottom line: For those looking to save a buck, for its low price, the Asus Memo Pad HD 7 has a bevy of useful features, though there are better performing options out there.

With the Asus Memo Pad HD 7, you really get what you pay for. The HD 7 earns its low price with a lackluster design and sluggish performance. It’s not very comfortable to hold for long periods of time, and aside from being offered in a variety of different colors, lacks a coolness other tablets try hard to aspire to.

Its performance is meekly mediocre, and consistent lagging combined with a sometimes unresponsive touch screen make the tablet best suited for simple tasks like browsing and reading.

That said, the HD 7 is a refreshing upgrade from its predecessor and its best feature is the 7-inch IPS screen that displays an impressively wide range of colors which facilitate a visually richer experience than the original Nexus 7.

If you’re on a strict budget, the Asus Memo Pad is an inexpensive and functional small tablet, but if you can spare the change, a new Nexus 7 is the better choice.

Design
Even though the tablet shares similar dimensions with the Nexus 7, it’s nowhere near as sleek or comfortable in design. The tablet fits fine in one hand, even for people with smaller hands like me, yet, despite its light weight, the design doesn’t lend itself to comfortable holding over lengthy periods of time.

The back panel protrudes slightly, and the corners slightly dig into your palms when holding it in both hands, instead of the flush, smoothly curved edges of the original Nexus 7. I often found myself wanting to put the device down after using it for awhile — not because I was done using it — but because holding it became tiresome.

The Asus Memo Pad HD 7 comes in navy blue, white, hot pink, and lime green. The navy blue version is the only one that has a back with a matte finish. The dark shade of blue attracts a minimal amount of fingerprints that are only highly visible from certain angles. The back panel is smooth and comfortable to the touch but can be a bit slippery without a tight grip.

In comparison, the reflective plastic backsides of the other colors looks less chic, but its texture helps one grip the device significantly better than the matte finish does. I personally prefer a back panel with a grippier texture, like the Nexus 7 (2012), because it enhances my comfort level in a way that extends the amount of time I can hold the device.

Since they’re both made by Asus, the Memo Pad HD 7 and the Nexus 7 (2012) share similar design elements. The power button and volume rocker on the right edge look almost identical in shape, while the rear speakers are similarly located towards the bottom edge of the tablet.

The front of the tablet is typically simple, with an Asus logo on the bottom bezel and a front-facing camera on the top. There is no ambient light sensor, therefore no automatic brightness setting.

The Memo Pad HD 7’s headphone jack, microphone pinhole, and Micro-USB port are all located on the top edge, with the microSD expansion slot — which is expandable up to 32GB — around the corner on the left edge. There are no ports on the bottom edge, but the speaker sits on the bottom of the tablet’s back, keeping the 5-megapixel rear camera on top company.

Asus Application Suite
The tablet comes loaded with the Asus Application Suite and features apps that range from useful to creative. The simple additions include a calendar, to-do list, and file manager, and it comes with 16GB of Asus WebStorage cloud service for one year.

Some of the apps that are geared towards family use include App Locker, which allows you to put passwords on specific apps; Asus Artists, where you can create “paintings” or greeting cards; and Asus Story, which helps you organize your photos into albums, or as they call them, “stories.”

The tablet comes with Power Saver, a battery saving feature that comes in handy if you’re trying to squeeze the most out of a low battery.

The custom mode lets you pick the specific functions that the power-saving option affects. For example, you can set a low screen brightness for listening to music, a higher one for watching video, and no power-saving function for reading books. When enabled, it significantly helped extend the battery life when it was low and the highly customizable options.

Floating apps
One of the most interesting and useful features on the tablet is the floating menu. On the Android navigation bar, there’s a button to the left of the back button that activates the floating menu.

When activated, a small menu pops up above the navigation bar that contains a selection of floating apps that you can quickly access without having to close whatever app you’re currently using. Since the apps “float” on the screen, on top of whatever is already open, it’s almost like a multiwindow option, but they can only perform simple tasks and can’t compare to the multiwindow functions that the Microsoft Surface or some of the Samsung Galaxy tablets provide.

Floating apps are an easy way to multitask, and I liked the ability to use the browser while watching video, but not all streaming video services continue to play while a floating app is open. With the exception of a few floating apps, including the calculator and compass, Netflix did not let me use most of the floating apps while simultaneously watching video, although YouTube did.

Despite providing an easy way to multitask, the floating apps don’t have the same functionality as the fullscreen app and are limited in their capabilities; the YouTube app only shows recommended videos — you can’t search — and the Twitter app displays only one tweet at a time. There is a limited amount of floating apps, and although the floating menu is customizable, not all downloaded apps have the ability to be floating ones.

Speaker features
The Memo Pad HD 7 houses stereo speakers with Asus SonicMaster audio technology and Audio Wizard software. Although the speakers aren’t great, the number of specific audio settings are. The tablet allows you to manually adjust separate volume settings for app audio, notifications, and alarms.

Tizen protype Display Tablet Appears on Internet

  • Posted on August 3, 2017 at 2:16 pm

A tablet operating system Tizen has just appeared on the internet. The emergence of the prototype tablet Tizen Tizen obtained from Indonesia who has a chance to look deeper into the tablet.

The tablet has a screen size of 10 inches and using the Tizen OS is a Linux-based OS developed by Intel with Samsung. According to the plan, the operating system will also be used in a variety of devices, from smartphones, tablets, laptops and even systems for vehicle bermotoro.

Tizen tablet prototype that appears is from a Japanese company called Shisutena. The tablet is also scheduled to be introduced this year in Japan. According to the Indonesian Tizen, this tablet will come with Tizen OS 2.1.

The tablet has a resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels with a 1.4GHz quad-core processor, 2GB RAM and 32GB of internal memory. The tablet also comes with 802.11n WiFi, 2MP rear camera and 0.3MP camera on the front.

Asphalt 8: Airborne Optimized for Tablet Nexus 7 Newest

  • Posted on August 1, 2017 at 4:32 pm

The latest series flagship racing game Gameloft, Asphalt 8: Airbourne will present shortly, has been optimized with OpenGL ES 3.0 for the latest tablet Nexus 7. As exhibited at Google Keynote event yesterday in San Francisco.
Baudoin Corman as Vice President of Gameloft Publishing Section Regional Americans say, 8 Asphalt is an ideal game to demonstrate the greatness of Google’s latest device, the graphics are awesome and convenient physical form, the Nexus 7 will certainly help boost the popularity of gaming on tablets and realize the vision of Asphalt 8.
In addition to the new engine, Asphalt 8 will also bring 180 events, 47 official cars, and new game modes. There is also an online multiplayer mode with global leaderboard and social features like Facebook. Gamloft is arguably the first game publisher in the gaming service that supports Google Play. Asphalt 8 itself will be the first Gameloft game titles integrated Google services and Google Play at launch.