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Lenovo ThinkPad X240S, Touch Screen 12.5 Inch Notebook With Intel Haswell CPU

  • Posted on December 29, 2016 at 12:51 am

The presence of the latest models of ThinkPad X240s will certainly strengthen the product line Lenovo ThinkPad Series notebooks on the market today. Along with that, a variety of retail product manuals and documents related to the latest models of Lenovo ThinkPad Series has also started popping up lately.

Lenovo ThinkPad X240S is provided by features 12.5-inch touch screen that supports a resolution of 1366 × 768 pixels. While on the power on for system support in it, Windows 8 x64-based laptop also has provided support for the option of Intel Core i7-4500U or Intel Core i5-4200U with collaboration 4GB of RAM and a 7200RPM hard drive capacity of 320GB.

With a water-resistant keyboard and a roll-cage design firm, this latest notebook also offers several business-friendly features that include SIM Card slot, the TrackPoint in the middle of the keyboard, and chasing that can be dismantled and reassembled for the purpose of adding additional components.

And even complete support for existing features, laptop-sized (305.5 × 206.5 × 19.7) mm and weighs 1.36 kg also has 720p webcam, 802.11a/b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet, D-Sub, mini DisplayPort, SDXC card reader, and a 6 Cell Lithium Polymer battery that can provide power for up to 6 hours of operation lasting duration.

Although the new soon to be released sometime in August 2013 that will come, but the Lenovo ThinkPad X240S is reportedly ready to sell for 6,498 HKD or equivalent 8.35 million per unit.

Mozilla ponders blinkers for your browser

  • Posted on December 29, 2016 at 12:11 am

Mozilla Labs has outlined an experiment it’s conducting in improving the personalisation web publishers can offer readers who browse their sites using Firefox.

The outfit says it’s been working on the idea since last year, when it “conducted a series of experiments in which a user’s browsing history could be matched with interests in categories like technology, sports and cooking.”

In return for opting in to the trial, lab rats were offered “insight into how they spend time online.”

Mozilla Labs is now wondering “what if these interests were also available for the user to share with the websites they visit to get a better, more personalized browsing experience” so that “content creators and consumers could benefit from Web-based interests”?

Here’s one scenario the outfit has imagined as resulting from this line of thinking:

“For example, let’s say Firefox recognizes within the browser client, without any browsing history leaving my computer, that I’m interested in gadgets, comedy films, hockey and cooking. As I browse around the Web, I could choose when to share those interests with specific websites for a personalized experience. Those websites could then prioritize articles on the latest gadgets and make hockey scores more visible.”

Some publishers have already pressed the API for this kind of thing into service, according to the Mozilla Blog, but the code is not in the wild and is being tested – technically and conceptually – as Mozilla figures out how people will react to websites that dynamically change content based on readers’ past behaviours.

One example of successful personalisation mentioned in the posts announcing the initiative is The Guardian’s offer to ensure its readers see no news about the birth of George Alexander Louis Windsor. That’s a service many will doubtless enjoy. Whether such personalisation can result in readers choosing only to encounter lines of inquiry and opinions they already agree with, and therefore deciding to consume media that re-enforces their feelings rather than offering broader perspectives, is a wider debate for another day. Or the comments.