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Acquainted with BASH Scripting

  • Posted on October 23, 2016 at 8:25 pm

It is undeniable that over time, the popularity of Linux is increasing every day. Linux Kernel project which was originally just a fun project by Linux apparently transformed into a project that became the basis for the evolution of the digital world today.

We can see that more and more digital devices are therein using Linux in it. Changes were made in all areas so that Linux can be used by all users, both from the ground level up to the experts though.

One thing that remains a hallmark of Linux is the existence of a shell that is never lost on any Linux distro. Shell is a command-line interpreter on duty to translate the commands entered by the user directly to the system through the help of a terminal or console as a zoom interface (such as Command Prompt on the Windows platform). Although today most of the Linux distributions already to offering graphical display, the shell is still regarded as one of the strengths of Linux shell bridge where users can interact with the system in order to be more flexible. Many things can be done on a shell because we are dealing directly with the system, coupled with the many variants of the shell that offers a variety of features in it, such as csh, sh, bash, ksh, tcsh, ash, zsh, etc.

One of the most common type of shell used is BASH (Bourne-Again Shell) which was created by Bryan Fox in 1988. Shell is a replacement of the Bourne Shell (sh) existing first and is still used in some Linux distributions. Currently BASH shell has become a de facto standard for almost all Linux distributions because it is considered the most feature-rich and has a fairly high degree of portability. For comparison between variants shell can be seen on the Wikipedia website

To be able to understand the Linux system with better and also improve your productivity and take advantage of the flexibility offered by Linux, so it’s good we are trying to learn programming BASH script. PCplus using Slackware Linux distro, but this tutorial can be applied to all Linux distributions for use BASH version 4.2 and above. You can use any text editor because basically BASH script is plain text file. You can also try it on a Windows platform with the help of Cygwin,

open the editor:

1. The first step in creating a shell script is telling the system what shell you want to use, because it could be available in a Linux distribution over the shell variant. Because we want to use bash, then write this line in the first row of each bash shell script that will be created

This code is called the shebang and a special instruction that will determine what the interpreter is going to be used to process a shell script. For example, for a script that utilizes Perl interpreter, it will contain information

2. Because the shell script is basically able to execute commands on the shell, then we can run shell commands from a shell script. For example, we want to display today’s date along with the name that we use username to login. Use the code on the listing-1 as an example. Before you can run the script, give it execute permissions on the file with the command chmod + x’s listing 1.sh (adjust the file name you gave) then run the command.

Date command displays the current date information while whoami will menapilkan your user information to login.

3. What if we want to display the text coupled with a shell command? Use the echo function to display a message to the screen shown in listing-2. Echo function accepts parameters in the form of a text message that will be displayed kelayar. You might ask, why the date and user information are on different lines with text displayed? This is due essentially echo function will display a message and then change the next line. To be able to display an information to the right of the text is displayed, use the-n parameter on the function like echo in the listing-3.

4. You can try some of the commands contained in the location / bin and / usr / bin. If not sure of the usefulness of a command, run the command man <nama-perintah> on the console or terminal, for example, man ls and manual information about the ls command will be displayed. Each command has a variation of different parameters with each other, so there are times when we have to read the manual to know every option available.